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and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
not know your c.v., you were a giant of the civil rights movement, chairman of the nonviolent student coordinating committee, the youngest and only surviving speaker at the 1963 march on washington when dr. king gave the "i have a dream" speech. you were a leader to the selma to montgomery march and a recipient of the presidential medal of freedom and profiles in courage award and you have a new book. i'm exhausted. (laughter). (cheers and applause) >> don't be exhausted. it's all right. >> stephen: i want to say that you do not outcivil rights pioneer me. because i held in my hand this is a banner from the march on washington, all right? got that. august 28, 1963, all right? this is in my hand because i was there. all right? in my mama's belly. she was pregnant with me and she was at the "i have a dream" speech so don't feel all high and mighty. i was at the "i have a dream speech" too. >> do you hear me? >> it was a little muffled. and i'm not sure if i'd developed ears yet. but, yeah, it was -- >> i spoke number six and dr. king spoke number ten. >> so you were the sixth person to
at overcriminalization in america. and barbara arnwine, president of the lawyers committee for civil rights. thank you both for joining me. >> thank you, rev. >> thank you. >> congressman, let me go to you first. what is your reaction to the news that new york officials will begin appealing this stop and frisk ruling tomorrow? >> the stubborn resistance to the fact that stop and frisk program is unnecessary, unconscionable, and now has been declared unconstitutional is really unfortunate. the numbers, reverend sharpton, as you have consistently pointed out speak for themselves. stop and frisk have nothing to do with the dramatic decline in crime that actually began to take place 20 years ago during the last two years of the dinkins administration. >> that's correct. >> where 1207 and frisk wasn't utilized but a dramatic infusion of the number of police officers that were displayed and put on the streets, particularly in high crime areas. the stop and frisk program doesn't target criminals, it targets innocent, law-abiding individuals. and nypd's own numbers illustrate that fact. 88% of the people who
students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy ers. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, r
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
was. there was a fight between left and right -- civil rights, anti-civil rights, the old seggies hanging in there. now it seems to be a party of sort of a general agreement. sort of the same party. but i noticed something over the weekend. the slow, what do you call it, the thing where you change color to meet the background, the fitting in thing of the animal. >> chameleon. >> the chameleon party seems to be changing color to a hillary background rather than an obama background. i know you are reporting on the phone all day must be hearing this. >> well, you know, what you hit on in the intro, chris, is right, which is i will say i am struck by how aggressive and how public she herself is being with this series of speeches. she's given one, going to give two more on sort of big topics, voting rights, foreign policy. talk about national security. there's no way to interpret those kind of speeches except that laying the groundwork for 2016. i'll add one other quick thing to it which is the ready for hillary super pac, the extent to which real clinton hands, i'm not talking about s
in this script? what story? >> i wanted to tell the history of the civil rights movement. it seems to me that that movement has not been properly told in hollywood. and you have world war ii, you've got the holocaust. these are extremely famous, they're part of our national consciousness and a lot of that have is because of movies and t.v. shows that have been made about them. there haven't been that many movies made about the civil rights movement and it's a shame because it's one of the most important dynamic and dramatic events of the 20th century. it deserves to have many movies made about it. for me i just really wanted to try and push that into the national consciousness the way that these other events have been dramatized. >> rose: the scope of history is told in intimate personal stories. >> exactly. exactly. that's the joy of doing "the butler." because the butler is in the white house and you can see him in meetings where decisions that are going to affect the entire nation are being made and through his family you see how those decisions are played out in the lives of everyday
the history of the civil rights movement. it seems to me that that movement has not been properly told in hollywood. and you have world war ii, you've got the holocaust. these are extremely famous, they're part of our national consciousness and a lot of that have is because of movies and t.v. shows that have been made about them. there haven't been that many movies made about the civil rights movement and it's a shame because it's one of the most important dynamic and dramatic events of the 20th century. it deserves to have many movies made about it. for me i just really wanted to try and push that into the national consciousness the way that these other events have been dramatized. >> rose: the scope of history is told in intimate personal stories. >> exactly. exactly. that's the joy of doing "the butler." because the butler is in the white house and you can see him in meetings where decisions that are going to affect the entire nation are being made and through his family you see how those decisions are played out in the lives of everyday americans so it seemed like if we could make
hope to bring in this script? what story? >> i wanted to tell the history of the civil rights movement. it seems to me that that movement has not been properly told in hollywood. and you have world war ii, you've got the holocaust. these are extremely famous, they're part of our national consciousness and a lot of that have is because of movies and t.v. shows that have been made about them. there haven't been that many movies made about the civil rights movement and it's a shame because it's one of the most important dynamic and dramatic events of the 20th century. it deserves to have many movies made about it. for me i just really wanted to try and push that into the national consciousness the way that these other events have been dramatized. >> rose: the scope of history is told in intimate personal stories. >> exactly. exactly. that's the joy of doing "the butler." because the butler is in the white house and you can see him in meetings where decisions that are going to affect the entire nation are being made and through his family you see how those decisions are played out in the l
and sought democratic nomination for president. also sterling tucker, civil rights activist, 1974, first chairman of d.c. council. very, very cool to see. thank you for sharing that with us miss carol. send us the pictures and recollections. you can e-mail mymarchdc@gmail.com. tweet us @myfoxdc. also on facebook. >> it is 7:21 on this tuesday morning. we are going to check in with holly who is looking at the significance on the march on washington and how the smithsonian is marking the fascinating march. more trouble for virginia governor bob mcdonnell. why charges could be right around the corner. time now is 7:21. the nest has been getting a littlele too quiet of late. so i decided it was time to find some real harmony with nature. [ screaming ] whoo! oh, yeah. elmo! [ howling ] mmm! [ eagle chirps ] [ train whistles ] [ bird chirping ] [ screaming ] [ tuba bellows ] whoa. hey! [ screaming ] [ snoring ] music to mom's ears. we may live in houses, but we're born for busch gardens. >> san diego imbattled mayor fill more and representatives had a closed door meeting with city officials. t
district. i have always been passionate about civil rights, equality for everyone. i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality issues. i guess i have always been vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, i have to listen to other perspectives and making decisions. >> very soon there will be of much more seniors in that area. we are trying to focus on whether a stop sign or stoplight might help. >> tried to look at issues of senior nutrition programs, housing policies that allowed our buildings to become more senior-friendly. also looking at how to support senior services, neighborhood- by-neighborhood programs that allow aging in place. people who are getting older helping each other stay in their homes and communities longer so that they can contribute as long as possible, as opposed to institutionalizing them. >> i support working families, livable communities, definite drawn support for the small business. even in my district, there are pockets of poverty and many people of work. so it is also about supporting those under
it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about s
with the father and son was so powerfully conveyed the history that is the civil rights movement. and i think that everybody can identify with the cost that not just blacks but white americans gave and to protect the civil liberties of the people of this time and i think that the movie isn't biased in its approach. i think it's on a universal platform that doesn't alienate any audience. i mean, we forget that america is made up of blacks, whites, asians, puerto ricans, everything. i mean, we're a melting pot of people and i think this movie kind of settles on that idea. >> lee, do you think that america is a more or less racist country since barack obama became president? >> wow. that's a powerful question. i think that people are angry that he's president and i think that they are showing their true colors and i think that you know when danny strong wrote those words, any black man could be killed by any white man and get away with it, trayvon martin had not happened. i end the movie with hope. you know, he's walking down and obama's giving that famous speech, you know, and then i come out o
, are not students of their of american history. they know about the civil rights movement and all that stuff. so last night we were having discussions about the training and i was explaining that all of these kids that went on the bus, that that was really real because in order to have the ability to not to fight back and not to just go against your -- because somebody spits on you there's a visceral reaction that you have that you want to knock that person out now go through the non-violence training, to take it because we had the conversation this morning with the girls about what would have happened had one of those people hit a white person or spit at them back. >> holy cow. >> holy cow. i mean, all would have broken loose. it would have been a bloodbath for sure. that's what's so extraordinary about it. >> rose: it reminds me of a scene in "42" about jackie robinson in which branch ricky is talking to the actor who played jackie robinson and he, the actor, says to harrison ford who plays branch richie "you need somebody here who's tough enough to fight back." and branch ricky says "i need s
now faces two and a-half years in prison, for misusing campaign funds. the son of civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson was sentenced at a federal court in washington this morning. jackson, who was treated for bipolar disorder, pleaded guilty to spending $750,000 from his campaign on items from mink capes to vacations. jackson's wife, sandra, received a one year prison sentence for filing false tax returns. a traveling hospital technician- - accused of infecting dozens of people with hepatitis "c"-- pleaded guilty today to drug charges. david kwiatkowski appeared in federal court in new hampshire. he admitted stealing syringes containing painkiller from hospitals, using the drug then filling the syringes with saline tainted with his blood. he's infected with hepatitis "c", and 46 people in four states have been diagnosed with the same strain. kwiatkowski faces up to 40 years in prison. on wall street, stocks were down on new concerns consumer spending is not as strong as hoped. the dow jones industrial average lost 113 points to close at 15,337. the nasdaq fell 15 points to close
on civil rights and economic inequality. speakers include civil rights leaders, labor activists and low-wage workers and the relevance of dr. king's vision today. it's live at 6 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. and tonight booktv in prime time continues. beginning at 8 eastern with jeff scherrer on a chain of thunder. at 9:05, ishmael beah talks about his second book, "radiance of tomorrow." at 9:20 from booktv in london, a discussion with biographer herr myny lee. and at 9:50 best with selling author hah led hosseini on his most recent book, "and the mountains echoed." booktv tonight at 8 eastern here on c-span2. >>> shifting gears to politics, democratic candidates running for new york city mayor take part in a debate ahead of the city's september 10th primary election. watch live coverage beginning at 6 eastern today on our companion network, c-span. >>> early on, you know, we said, okay, we have this 16-acre piece of land, we have to put some things on it or maybe not. it was just an open-ended what do we do with it, right? and everyone wanted a say in it. very quickly leaders promised
the march has affected the economy and civil rights today. this nearly three hour event was at the afl-cio headquarters many washington last month. -- in washington last month. [inaudible conversations] >> so, ladies and gentlemen, we do expect a full crowd, so at some point if we gets folks who come in this and we don't have enough seats, i may ask you to raise your hand so we can identify seats unoccupied next to you so we can get people seated in as expeditious a fashion as possible. well, let me welcome you all to this unfinished march symposium. my name is christian dorsey, i'm the director of external affairs at the economic policy institute, and i'll be your host and master of ceremonies for this afternoon's symposium which really is a convening of some of the most incredibly talented, thoughtful speakers and commentators on issues affecting folks of color, workers, as well as politics in america. this is a symposium that has taken many months to prepare and is really the brain child and inspiration of epi's director of the program on race, ethnicity and the economy, alier nonau
security and office, don't want a state of civil war in egypt but look where egypt sits. gaza is right there. one of the big interests the u.s. has had is in the egyptian government keeping that closing, border crossing closed because for israelis that's a matter of security because hamas is on the side of the border running gaza strip. you have gulf states that have their own sides, taken their own sides. how does egypt work its way out of the box when you have regional interest at play rainfall there's much at stake and no doubt. if you look at the violence in the sinai peninsula up along the border of gaza and israel, you begin to get a sense of just how perilous this is. if it's out of control, see a civil conflict erupt in a way we've already seen tragically in the last week, you have a very volatile situation regionally. i think what mona was expressing was the heart of this. that is the egyptian people deserve better. there's very much the sense of what they fought for in tahrir square, over mubarak, 30-year dictator who ran a brutal and corrupt government. it did a terrible job
when you have the demonstrations against apartheid. saw it in the u.s. when you had civil rights movement, that's what you saw initially. beneath that a lot of organizing, tactical maneuvering, institutions to go with it so you're successful, the march on washington underlying that was a bill trying to get through congress that this popular uprising would support. was that the failure, maybe what the u.s. could have done was support institution building to go along with what's happening on the ground. >> mainly institutional reform, before we talk about institution building, it's a little bit of an unfair statement when we talk about the revolutionary and activists have been lazy in organizing. they are fighting institutions that have been there with their pathologist for 30 and more years. you can't come today and ask people like we are going to fight and reform on our own. the issue is, again, not changing people, names, or political parties but reforming those institutions and also the revolution was about changing the relationship between state institution. this did not happe
, mayor lee will now announce the initiative. and as a long-time civil rights champion and leader, mayor lee has infused san francisco's city government with a new sense of inclusive collaborative leadership effectiveness and boundless energy, creative innovation and energy. so, mayor lee. (applause) >> thank you, adrian. i don't know about boundless energy. [laughter] >> but i do -- i am inspired by our immigrant community. we've done so much that i think the city is -- its dna is really about our diversity. let me thank adrian. she's been a wonderful leader at the office of civic engagement and immigrant affairs, leading an effort not just with the immigrant rights commission, but a good strong relationship with our community-based organizations that do all of the great on the groundwork with our immigrant families, people who are coming here as refugees, adjusting, people who come here, permanent residents, people who have come here seeking their future, their hopes for themselves and their families. also people who often came here by different ways and stayed, and maybe overstayed th
generally think of the 1960s as the beginning of the civil rights movement. however the changes that came about in the 1960s may not have happened without the efforts of some determined african-american women in the 1940s. another march on washington was planned in 1941. it was led by a. philip randolph with the help of two women named lilo lane and pauline maier's. philip randolph called for african-americans to come to the nation's capital on july 1 to draw attention to discrimination in hiring practices send in the military. the march never took place because president roosevelt signed executive order 8802 which bans discrimination in the employment of workers in defense industries and government. the march on washington movement was established then to continue to fight for equality for african-americans. and it was organized largely by three women lately lain pauline maier's and a woman named apple king. they developed a slogan for the movement. nonviolence, goodwill, direct action. in other words than courage to african-americans to resist discrimination by direct action taken with
. civil rights activists are celebrating the decision, but it has had political fallout. why will this hurt people like michael bloomberg. >> what is really historic about the stop-and-frisk story, we could see the first major election decided by civil rights issues than we've seen in decades. this was a real rebuke of michael bloomberg, the fact that the federal judges said that the practice is inherently inconstitutional, that's what they found. watching all of these candidates trying to become the civil rights candidates. you have christine quinn who has been close to michael bloomberg. while they all say racial profiling is bad, what we see are candidates who took it a step further who say they supported council bills who said flood out there needs to be an inspector who oversees the nyc practices, and guess who else greed with that, the federal judge. so de blasio went out with a great add featuring his african-american son who said my candidate will be the one who stops stop and frisk. now we see de blasio volting to first place. he's leading substantially in first plac
also be on the civil rights agenda and also the racial wealth gap that roger clay spoke about would also be on the agenda. we will also be releasing essays on those topics. again unfinished march.com will other e2 that. so, we have raised a number of issues today and i know that people will want to continue the commerce asian, to get involved, to to obtain more information. and you can do that i simply contacting the organizations that have been involved with this symposium. some of which you are probably aware of and there are some due to complex and schedules that were not able to participate today. so i'm just going to list the organizations to thank them but you should also know that if you are interested in whatever topic these are organizations you can contact for more information to get educated and if they are membership organizations to join. my thanks goes to the afl-cio for hosting us and everything that they have done. [applause] also, him, and unions the united autoworkers supported us and they are also very important in the 63 march on washington for jobs and freedom.
anniversary of the civil rights march on washington, d.c.. two people there are sharing their memories and one of them is receiving a special award tonight we're live with the story tonight. carolyn? >> the person being honored tonight is now a professor here, back then he was a 32-year-old close advisor to dr. king. other person is a minister and local act ti vismt now they under their 80s with vivid memories of the march. it's been described as both a prot skbreft a celebration. the march was a of pivotal moment in the civil rights move oomt what did it feel like to be in the middle of that? >> felt like something was going to not only happen but that i was in it and made me realize i was to be a part of something that was going to really make history owe now 83 years old reverend cecil williams says it was thrilling to be in the crowd of the 250,000. >> and once that had been set and message had been begun i said that is it. i'm going to san francisco he had just been assigned to glide church moving that month to san francisco this, picture shows the enthen 33-year-old challenging unequal e
why that whale died. >> next week marks 50th anniversary of the civil rights march on washington, d.c.. two people there are sharing their memories and one of them is receiving a special award tonight we're live with the story tonight. carolyn? >> the person being honored tonight is now a professor here, back then he was a 32-year-old close advisor to dr. king. other person is a minister and local act ti vismt now they under their 80s with vivid memories of the march. it's been described as both a prot skbreft a celebration. the march was a of pivotal moment in the civil rights move oomt what did it feel like to be in the middle of that? >> felt like something was going to not only happen but that i was in it and made me realize i was to be a part of something that was going to really make history owe now 83 years old reverend cecil williams says it was thrilling to be in the crowd of the 250,000. >> and once that had been set and message had been begun i said that is it. i'm going to san francisco he had just been assigned to glide church moving that month to san francisco this, pi
. we will get them on later on the show. >>> coming up i'm speaking with civil rights leader norm hill. we talk about michelle's big album for hip-hop kids. we will be right back. this man is about to be the millionth customer. would you mind if i go ahead of you? instead we had someone go ahead of him and win fifty thousand dollars. congratulations you are our one millionth customer. nobody likes to miss out. that's why ally treats all their customers the same. whether you're the first or the millionth. if your bank doesn't think you're special anymore, you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally. the school year has everyone out of the house, so help protect your home with adt. and right now you can get adt security installed starting at just $49, a savings of $250. but hurry. offer ends soon. call right now or visit adt.com. this is a fire that didn't destroy a home. this is a break-in that didn't devastate a family. this is the reason why. adt. you can't predict when bad things will happen, but you can help protect yourself with the fast alarm response of adt, with 24/7 m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 493 (some duplicates have been removed)